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What if your time at university were for nothing? What if fretting over assignments never amounted to much? Stop and think: How employable will you be after the three or more years? If you are planning on becoming an engineer or IT specialist, then yes, perhaps there is a strong demand out there. That Arts degree? Not so much. Even a Law degree doesn’t guarantee work straight out of university these days. Employability goes far beyond a degree, and if that’s all you have then it isn’t enough. What we understand of education and work is evolving, and the discerning student is advised to be adaptable.

Universities date back far beyond institutes such as Oxford, but it was this English model that paved the way for modern establishments. What began as exclusive clubs for the rich and privileged have become more and more open to the masses. Today the focus is on an extended pedagogy. Going to university immediately after finishing secondary school is expected. Adults will hop between careers numerous times throughout their working lives, and colleges account for these mature age students. Learning is for life. Despite this demographic and ideological shift the university remains a revered, hallowed place.

How long will this last though? It exceedingly appears—like with the rest of culture before—that the sandstone halls may soon be ground to dust under the indomitable advance of technology.

Online learning has long been available, but will become much more integral to uni life. The sudden boom in MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) will see the pendulum swing entirely that way. As The Economist puts it, “…online provision is transforming higher education, giving the best universities a chance to widen their catch, opening new opportunities for the agile, and threatening doom for the laggard and mediocre.” Boundaries break down, and more people have access to better tools. Start-ups include Udacity, Coursera, and edX, and you can sign up to them right now (There’s even an Australian option called Open2Study). This is all potentially good for the budding scholar, but what does it mean for campuses?

For the top, not a lot. There is no denying that there won’t be a shake-up, but the best have a pedigree, and it is hard to qualify an online degree. Mid-tier universities will have to specialise, and have an online campus in conjunction with the physical one. It could go the way of the publishing industry, with an amalgamation of large bodies and a proliferation of specialised providers. Like with any industry, once supply reaches a critical peak, demand and income become bottle-necked. For the liberal-leaning education system this will cause issues.

The case for earning your degree is less and less compelling simply because everybody has one. Unless it’s for medicine, engineering, or IT, wasting time and money at university is an increasingly futile project when your future prospects are grim. Has anyone ever told you to do a ‘real’ degree? It probably came from a thirty year old earning a six-figure paycheck who’s sick of paying for your worthless education. Your parents may tell you to follow your dreams, but when you’re leaning on the system only to fall down the rabbit hole it’s perhaps time to do a Business major. If you’re a “P’s get degrees” vagrant, then may the dean have mercy on your soul.

That said the world should not revolve around job prospects and practicality. There is a difference between working for happiness (short term) and for meaning (long term). Were work merely for productivity, governments would allot educational pathways to its young citizens rather than have the hassle of freedom of choice. Actually, that could be a great system. Show a penchant for mathematics and an interest in Lego at a young age, and you’re an engineer for life. Good bye existential crisis, hello smooth groove of infinity. Of course, no government in their right mind would assign the role of, say, film director or food stylist, let alone journalist (unless it was Propaganda Minister). That is why we have so many universities offering a massive range of learning opportunities.

But work is changing. The graduate of today should look forward to internships, contracts and multiple part-time undertakings. And the liberating thought is that it won’t revert back to the good old days. Perhaps we will subsist on a civilian wage as our AI accomplices perform the mundane tasks. In a post-work, post-scarcity civilization, will we become bored as the days drag by, or will humanity reach another era of enlightenment and innovation? Wherever we end up, diplomas and degrees are sure to be laughable relics.

In the here and now though, experience is everything. Get out there and find part-time work at McDonald’s. Buy a camera and get off Instagram. Travel the world (preferably not the Western one). Youth occurs once, and an empty savings account means you’re making the most of it. And if you want to study Creative Writing, well, it’s your life.

About Thomas Wilson

Originally from Brisvegas, Tom moved to Melbhattan for both love and labour. A constant reader of everything within eyesight, he has developed a love of science and fiction, often in combination. Currently studying a Master of Publishing and Editing, he hopes to give the subjunctive tense the respect it deserves.

Thomas Wilson

The author Thomas Wilson

Originally from Brisvegas, Tom moved to Melbhattan for both love and labour. A constant reader of everything within eyesight, he has developed a love of science and fiction, often in combination. Currently studying a Master of Publishing and Editing, he hopes to give the subjunctive tense the respect it deserves.

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