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Review: Arca

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Venezuelan-born producer Alejandro Ghersi has established himself as one of music’s more exciting voices in recent times. Having worked with the likes of FKA twigs, Kanye West and Björk it is with Arca (2017), that he offers not merely a conceptually realised album but also a record cementing his own posterity. Ghersi’s collaborative efforts on Björk’s most recent LP Vulnicura (2015) have clearly shifted his tone and influenced the work of the eponymously titled third album. A time he described as ‘a mind blowing, consciousness-expanding process to grow’. The pathos that was offered by Björk on Vulnicura is similarly—and welcomingly—matched
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Culture

Melbourne International Comedy Festival Reviews Part Two

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Nick Caddaye: He Didn’t Make It By Christian Blackwell Caddaye was dramatic from the beginning,he opened the affair looking like a principal ready to hand down a slap on the wrist. Yet Caddaye portrayed himself in a seriously humorous manner, descending from the top of a flight of winding stairs with a set of dead mackerel eyes. It was clear that Caddaye took himself as a no-nonsense comedian, and it seemed like his show was finely and definitively crafted in advance. Caddaye reflects on modern society in a journalistic way, he has a certain gumption towards philosophical characters. He ponders
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Culture

The Human Implications of Scorsese’s Taxi Driver

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  Last year, the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) presented a fantastic retrospective on the American film director Martin Scorsese. As an avid fan of cinema and an even greater fan of Scorsese’s films, I voraciously anticipated seeing his 1976 magnum opus, Taxi Driver, on the silver screen. Taxi Driver is a film that immediately places the viewer firmly within the venal streets of ‘70s New York. It throws us into the political and social context of that era as we come to know the anti-hero of the film, Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro), a Vietnam war veteran.
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